Wood Could Lower Your Blood Pressure

campfireDid you know wood could lower your blood pressure?

Well, maybe not directly but sitting around a crackling campfire may indeed lower your blood pressure!

Our enjoyment of gazing at fire is in our DNA, as the act of gathering around a fire dates back to prehistoric times. As humans we, socialized around camp fires, a place where we fell safe and warm.

When we sit around a fire, we are in a multi-sensory state utilizing auditory, heat, olfactory, visual, and smoke/food taste.

The studies showed that people who stared at and or listened to a fire for at least 15 minutes, had both their diastolic and systolic level drop 1.9 and 1.3 points respectfully.

Dr. Lynn believes it the comforting vibe and fire’s light spectrum, that puts one in a trancelike state.

What is the Maffetone 180 Formula?

Yellowstone Half Marathon - Winded BowhunterI was researching different workout programs to assist me in getting my heart healthier, burning fat more efficiently and increasing my physical endurance.

Was there even such a program? No…

But, there is The 180 Formula methodology, which I found talking to a few ultra runners! [Read more…]

Best Gear Protection

This is what I use to protect my most important gear!

 What do you trust your most important gear to?

Try Any New Outdoor Activity

super spartan gladiator

If you could try any new outdoor activity, or go somewhere new to you – what and or where would it be? [Read more…]

Wilderness Athlete Unveils Meal Replacement Shakes

Wilderness Athlete Meal Replacement and Recovery Shake - ChocolateWilderness Athlete is proud to unveil their new Meal Replacement and Recovery Shake for outdoorsmen who are looking to lose or maintain their current body weight.

Outdoorsmen often work hard during the summer to lose weight to prepare for the fall hunting season, only to gain weight as hunting season ends and the holiday season begins. The Wilderness Athlete meal replacement shake can help hunters lose excess body weight and stay lean and mean year round. [Read more…]

Wayne Huber Named US Olympic Committee Staff Physician

Ascential Bioscience is pleased to congratulate Dr. Wayne Huber, an Ascential Independent Distributor and Certified Chiropractic Sports Physician, on his recent acceptance by the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) to serve as a staff physician at the Chula Vista Olympic Training Center’s campus clinic in California from July 12-26, 2010.

During this time, Dr. Huber will provide a variety of medical services for our nation’s top Olympic athletes as they prepare to compete around the world. The USOC selects a number of top physicians from around the country, based upon information in the doctor’s application, recommendations, job performance, peer reviews, experience, and quality of care. Dr. Huber has been in practice for 11 years and currently is an owner at Active Spine and Rehabilitation in Sioux Falls, SD. He also owns the Edward Tieszen Clinic in Marion, SD, where he practices with his associate, Dr. Chris Willers.

Dr. Huber has previously served in national arenas such as the Ironman Triathlon, professional surfing, professional skateboarding, professional snowboarding and skiing, MLB, and the NFL, as well as local athletic affiliations with the Sioux Falls Storm and the University of Sioux Falls Athletics.

Ascential is delighted to share this exciting news about one of its top Midwest distributors appointed to play a key role in the preparation of the nation’s Olympic athletes.

Can Hunting Be Good For Your Health?

This is a great article to provide us with yet another way to prove that the outdoors is truly good for you!

The article is written by Diane Tipton who is an Information Officer for the Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks.

Diane states that hunting can be a healthy workout for the physically fit, but couch potatoes who set out Oct. 25 for the general hunting season with a rifle and an elk license may risk cardiovascular and other health-related issues.

And they are doing something about the situation.

Read the full article here!

Pre-season Training with Dan Staton

Sportsmans FitnessDan Staton over at Sportsmans Fitness has some great pre-season training advice for those of you looking to get ready for your hunting season.

Dan was greatly needed and is appreciated by us backcounty hunters!  He writes for several different mags, blogs and resides on several Pro Staff  Teams including Sitka.

Catch the full post here.

Bridger’s Baldy

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This is a nice article from Aaron Schultz with Outside Bozeman, on hiking. Not only does this article put it in perspective, it also has some great photos of south-western Montana.

Read the full article here.

Elk Country Athlete: 5 Ways to Train for Better Hunting

 

 

MISSOULA, Mont.—Wilderness elk hunting is an athletic endeavor but you don’t need to kill yourself getting in shape. Cameron Hanes, fitness and bowhunting authority as well as TV show host and columnist for the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, says moderation in exercise is a key for most hunters.

“You don’t have to be a world-class athlete to build up amazing endurance, but you do have to get started with some sort of workout regimen. Every day you spend in inactivity, you get weaker. Every day that elk move through high country, they get stronger. And the longer you wait to exercise, the wider the gap grows,” said Hanes.

Here are five ways to start closing the gap.

1. Try a “commercial workout” when you’re sitting around watching TV. Do push-ups and sit-ups during the commercials. Over the summer months, this exercise can make a big difference.

2. If you’ve been doing nothing recently, there’s no point in running. Going overboard right out of the gate will only make you too sore, cause you to hurt yourself or burnout quickly. Go for a brisk walk instead. Walk for 10 minutes and slowly jog for five. Do this back-to-back for 30 minutes, four times a week, for a couple of weeks. Slowly begin to lengthen the overall workout, and then start increasing the jogging time.

3. You needn’t spend tons of time. If you’re at your ideal weight, you need just 30 minutes per day of exercise, minimum. If weight loss is a concern, experts say it takes an hour of exercise each day to lose weight without going on a diet. Thirty minutes will do for weight loss if you both diet and exercise.

4. Hard workouts are not always better. Some of the world’s greatest athletes exercise at “conversation pace,” meaning their pace is easy enough to have a conversation while running. Even many Olympians workout at a comfortable pace 90 percent of the time. As you get into shape, try long (45 minutes or more) comfortable workouts three or four days a week. Then, one day a week, do a harder fast-paced workout.

5. Mix it up. Add some variety to your walking and jogging with cross-training and lifting weights—but keep in mind that almost everything you do in elk hunting begins and ends with your legs. Throw on your pack and climb hills or bleachers. Get on a bike. In the weight room, emphasize squats and lunges. Lots of reps are more important than heavy weights, because for elk hunting you need lean muscle, not size.

When hunting season arrives, Hanes says, remember to pace yourself. The endurance you’ve built over the summer will allow you hunt longer, not necessarily faster or harder. Many hunters tend to overexert at first and hit the wall quickly. Slow, steady hunting for longer periods gives you your best chance to take an elk.

While he admits it’s not for everyone, Hanes prepares for elk season by training for and competing in ultramarathons, races up to 100 miles or more across high-elevation trails. His advice on workouts for hunters spans from basic suggestions for average people to highly technical info for elite athletes in elk country.

Hanes serves RMEF as host of “Elk Chronicles” on Outdoor Channel and as a columnist for “Bugle” magazine. His second book, “Backcountry Bowhunting, A Guide to the Wild Side and is currently in its fifth printing.