Find Out What Bears Really Do In The Woods

Grizzly Bear Losinski IDFGIdaho Falls – When it comes to bears and humans a strange bond exists. As infants we give our children stuffed bears, yet as adults many people fear being in the same woods where bears might be. The Idaho Department of Fish & Game (IDFG) will be hosting a free workshop to help demystify bears and help humans to understand what they can do to keep themselves and bears from getting into trouble. [Read more…]

Fall Black Bear Hunting Season Begins Soon

The fall black bear hunting season begins Sept. 15 in most areas of Montana.   The archery season for black bear begins Sept. 4. All hunters should check the regulations for season date exceptions.

Hunters may purchase a black bear hunting license at all FWP offices, FWP license providers, or online at fwp.mt.gov , under Online Services until Aug. 31. After Aug. 31, the licenses will be available only at FWP offices or online, and there is a five-day wait on their use.

Black bear hunters must have successfully completed the Black Bear Identification Test and must present a certificate of completion when purchasing a black bear license.  The training and test are available on FWP’s website at fwp.mt.gov under Online Services.  A paper version of the test may be obtained at FWP offices or license providers.

2010 Black Bear hunting regulations are available on the FWP website at fwp.mt.gov , from FWP license providers and at FWP offices.

Black Bear, Mountain Lion License Deadline

Black Bear : Hunters may purchase a black bear hunting license at all FWP offices, FWP license providers, or online at fwp.mt.gov , under Online Services. After Aug. 31 the licenses are only available at FWP offices and there is a five-day wait on the use of bear hunting licenses.

Black bear hunters must have successfully completed the Black Bear Identification Test and must present a certificate of completion when purchasing a black bear license.  The training and test are available on FWP’s website at fwp.mt.gov under Online Services.  A paper version of the test may be obtained at FWP offices or license providers. Black Bear hunting regulations for 2010 are available on the FWP web site at fwp.mt.gov , from FWP license providers and at FWP offices.

Mountain Lion : For mountain lion licenses, hunters may purchase a mountain lion hunting license at all FWP offices, FWP license providers, or online at fwp.mt.gov , under Online Services. After Aug. 31 the licenses are only available at FWP offices and there is a five-day wait on the use of mountain lion hunting licenses. Some districts require special licenses that have to be applied for by August 31.  Successful applicants are required to purchase a license.  A mountain lion trophy permit must be purchased after a mountain lion kill.

2010 Spring Black Bear Hunting Regulation Changes Cause Confusion

A change in Montana’s 2010 black bear hunting regulations is causing confusion among some hunters who are required to validate their license for spring black bear hunting in northwestern Montana.

New for the spring black bear hunt only is a change that requires hunters to validate their license at the time of purchase, choosing either:

  • hunt the entire state—except in northwestern Montana’s Bear Management Units 100, 102, 104, 105 and 108, or
  • hunt only in northwestern Montana’s BMUs 100, 102, 104, 105 and 108—and nowhere else in the state.

For those hunters who already purchased a bear license with an incorrect validation, they can exchange them through April 15 at any FWP office for a new license that is properly validated.

Hunters who purchase black bear licenses after April 15 must obtain them over the counter at an FWP office and cannot use them for five days after the purchase date. Bear hunters must also successfully complete FWP’s bear ID training prior to purchasing their first black bear license.

FWP urges black bear hunters to refresh their bear identification skills every year to be able to distinguish a black bear from a grizzly. Grizzly bears, a federally protected, threatened species, are not hunted in Montana. To locate the online FWP bear ID test, go to Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Bear Identification Program .

To review the online 2010 black bear regulations, go to the FWP Web site at fwp.mt.gov and click on the Hunting page and then Regulations.

$11,000 Reward in Grizzly Poaching

Grizzly BearState and federal officials have increased the reward in a grizzly poaching case on the Rocky Mountain Front to $11,000.

“We’re still looking for leads,” says Mike Martin, Fish, Wildlife and Parks game warden captain.

The large grizzly bear was shot in late July near Swift Dam Road west of Dupuyer. [Read more…]

Bear Safety Education & Outreach Efforts Recognized

IdahoFish-Game

At the upcoming Yellowstone Grizzly Coordinating Committee in Jackson, Wyoming, the Idaho contingent will be recognizing the education and outreach efforts of local groups and media who have worked to promote a bear smart mentality through education campaigns, media outreach, and on the ground projects.

“These individuals, groups, and media outlets all understand that bears and humans can live safely together if the information about how to do so is made available in a manner that is clear and understandable,” said Gregg Losinski, regional conservation educator for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game in Idaho Falls.

The groups receiving a plaque with a grizzly bear track cast and recognition plate are:

  • The North Fork Club in Island Park.
  • Elizabeth Laden and The Island Park News.
  • Joyce Edlefsen and The Rexburg Standard Journal.
  • The Grizzly Bear and Wolf Discovery Center in West Yellowstone.

“Elizabeth Laden and the Island Park News have worked not only with Fish and Game and the U.S. Forest Service, but the Center for Wildlife Information and community groups to spread the word about bear safety,” Losinski said.

Recently, the Island Park News teamed up with bear spray producer Counter Assault to distribute free cans of bear spray and to teach how to use it properly. Materials provided free from CWI have served as the constant centerpiece for all programs in the area.

“Local newspaper writer Joyce Edlefsen has gone out of her way to help us reach the public about safely living and recreating in bear country through in-depth research in the writing of her bear-related stories,” Losinski said.

From a more practical standpoint, the Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center has worked with the Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee to develop a line of containers for trash and food that are bear resistant. The Center does not create the containers, but allows its resident grizzly bears to function as product testers to see whether the containers made by various companies can meet the criteria set by the Grizzly Bear Committee.

The North Fork Club in Island Park was recognized for its on-the-ground efforts to make it a reality that humans and bears can coexist.

“This association has tackled real life issues related to living in bear country and showed that it can be done if the commitment is there,” Losinski said.

While no formal recognition process exists, Losinski, who heads up the Information and Education Committee for the Grizzly Bear Committee, hopes that these awards in Idaho will stimulate similar recognition by other committee member organizations.

“Making it so humans and bears can coexist is not strictly a government thing; it takes hard work and cooperation from private individuals, businesses, and the media to be successful,” Losinski said.

For more information about bear safety, bear-resistant containers and ongoing efforts to recover grizzly bears in the Lower 48 go to: www.igbconline.org.

Grizzly To Be Evicted From Park

Photo by Stephen Oachs

Photo by Stephen Oachs

WEST GLACIER — A 17-year-old female grizzly bear and her two yearlings that repeatedly entered backcountry campgrounds occupied by people this summer are being removed from Glacier National Park, Superintendent Chas Cartwright said Thursday.

Read the full article here.

FWP Seeks Comment On Grizzly

Montana Fish Wildlife Parks - FWP

 

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parksis seeking public comment on a proposed agreement among neighboring states on the shared management of grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

The proposed agreement defines the process by which the states of Montana, Idaho and Wyoming could develop annual quota recommendations if they seek to establish grizzly bear hunting seasons. None of the states are considering hunting season at this time. The agreement is aligned with the Grizzly Bear Conservation Strategy for the Greater Yellowstone Area and state management plans.

The overall conservation strategy, which was developed by state and federal scientists and managers, includes area-wide caps on grizzly bear mortalities, intensive monitoring of Yellowstone bears, their food, and their habitats.

Yellowstone grizzly bears were removed from the federal endangered species list in 2007. Grizzly numbers in the Yellowstone ecosystem have increased from as few as 136 bears when they were listed as threatened in 1975, to more than 500 bears today.

For more information, visit FWP online at  fwp.mt.gov. Click Recent Public Notices and search for 2009 Grizzly Bear MOU . Comments are due by 5 p.m. on Aug. 12. Send comments to Grizzly Bear MOU,   Wildlife Division, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks, P.O. Box 200701, Helena, MT   59620-0701, or via e-mail to fwpwld@mt.gov.

Outdoor advocates urge Congress to create more wilderness in Montana

 

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Two decades after then-President Ronald Reagan vetoed a statewide Montana wilderness bill, retired U.S. Forest Service officials and others are urging the state’s congressional delegation to take a shot at getting another bill passed by Congress.

“This letter is but another indication that Montanans are trying to jumpstart legislative consideration of wilderness designation,” said former Montana Congressman Pat Williams.

Williams was one of 14 wilderness advocates who signed a letter sent Thursday to Sens. Max Baucus and Jon Tester, both Montana Democrats, and Rep. Denny Rehberg, R-Mont., asking them to make new wilderness designation a top priority.

Threats to the state’s wild lands, where elk and grizzly bear roam and trout-filled mountain streams flow unchecked, are cited in the request.

Dale Bosworth, the retired chief of the U.S. Forest Service, who lives in Missoula, was among those to sign the letter.

“We definitely need a wilderness bill for Montana, and it is past time for a statewide bill,” he said.

The congressional delegation offered no promises. [Read more…]