Contact Representatives to pass SHARE Act

Rocky-Mountain-Elk-Foundation-LogoRMEF Members,

Contact Your House Representatives

The U.S. House of Representatives is scheduled to vote on an important bill this week that would help preserve our outdoor traditions. The Sportsmen’s Heritage and Recreation Enhancement (SHARE) Act of 2015 (H.R. 2406) revises a variety of existing programs to expand access to, and opportunities for, hunting, fishing and recreational shooting.

SHARE Act highlights:

  •     Makes existing exemption from EPA regulation for lead shot permanent, adds lead tackle as an exempted product
  •     Extends/increases states’ authority to allocate Pittman-Robertson funding for acquiring land for expanding/constructing public shooting ranges
  •     Requires Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and U.S. Forest Service (USFS) lands be open for hunting, fishing and recreational shooting unless specifically closed
  •     Requires U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) to consider the priority public uses as hunting and fishing when adding new lands to National Wildlife Refuge System
  •     Provides for the use of volunteers from the hunting community to cull excess animals on BLM, USFS, FWS and National Park System lands

Go here to see the full text of the bill.

Find your representative and his/her contact information here.

Our combined involvement as sportsmen and women in this process will ensure the future of our hunting heritage and our outdoor way of life. Thank you for being engaged and making a difference.

Sincerely,

M. David Allen
RMEF President & CEO

Wildlife Day Camp Scheduled by Natural Resource Agencies

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service have scheduled a free day camp in Coeur d’Alene August 2-6, 2010 for children ages 9 to 10 (as of July 1, 2010).

The camp will be held from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. in the nature center at the North Idaho Fairgrounds in Coeur d’Alene. During these hours, kids have the opportunity to learn about the wildlife around them through fieldtrips, unique crafts, hands on activities, journals and interactions with live animals.

There will be field trips studying forests, prairies, wetlands, and streams.

Due to the nature of the program, space is limited to only 12 participants. Registration is due by July 25. Registration will be processed in the order it is received. Lunch can be provided to children in special circumstances.

To register for this great opportunity, you may come to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, 2885 Kathleen Ave in Coeur d’Alene and complete a registration form, or call 208-769-1414 and ask for a registration form to be mailed to you.

Land Transfer Keeps Nevada Landscape Intact

MISSOULA, Mont.–A spectacular landscape in northeast Nevada will remain intact for elk, other wildlife and public access following a land transfer from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation to the Bureau of Land Management.

The conveyance prevents residential development on 235 acres of inholdings within Goshute Canyon Wilderness 20 miles north of Ely, Nev.

[Read more…]

Elk Foundation Grants to Benefit 15 Wyoming Counties

 

 

MISSOULA, Mont.—Fifteen counties in Wyoming are slated for wildlife habitat conservation projects using $352,547 in new grants from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

The 2009 RMEF grants will affect Albany, Bighorn, Carbon, Converse, Laramie, Lincoln, Natrona, Park, Sheridan, Sublette, Sweetwater, Teton, Uinta, Washakie and Weston counties.

Additional projects have statewide interest.

“Our volunteers across Wyoming helped drive the 2008 fundraisers that made these grants possible. This is where Elk Foundation banquets, auctions and other events transform into on-the-ground conservation work, and it’s part of the payday for supporters who are passionate about giving something back to the outdoors,” said David Allen, Elk Foundation president and CEO.

Elk Foundation grants will help fund the following Wyoming projects, listed by county:

Bighorn County—Prescribe burn 300 acres of juniper and mountain sagebrush to improve forage for elk, bighorn sheep, mule deer, sage grouse and antelope in BLM Devil’s Canyon area.

Carbon County—Continue efforts to secure 1,561-acre conservation easement on a private ranch containing elk habitat surrounded by subdivision and energy developments; prescribe burn 2,775 acres to improve elk winter range in Medicine Bow National Forest Big Sandstone area; thin and prescribe burn to improve habitat in Sierra Madre/Little Snake River area of Medicine Bow National Forest; clean ditches and install 1,500 feet of pipeline to improve and expand irrigation and forage on elk winter range at Pennock Mountain Wildlife Management Area; install wildlife friendly fencing and water troughs at two springs to improve use by livestock and elk in BLM Romios Spring area.

Converse County—Using prescribed fire, restore grasses, forbs, aspen and water availability for elk and other wildlife on the North Laramie Range (also affects Albany, Natrona and Converse counties); sponsored deer/antelope hunts with Paralyzed Veterans of America; sponsored Wyoming State 4-H Shooting Sports Competition for about 500 youths competing in pistol, rifle, archery, muzzleloader and shotgun skills.

Laramie County—Install three fence-exclosures around spring water sources to restore riparian areas for elk along BLM North Crow Creek area.

Lincoln County—Utilize biological and chemical control mechanisms, control weed infestations to enhance forage for elk in Bridger-Teton National Forest.

Natrona County—Thin and prescribe burn encroaching conifer and sagebrush to improve aspen communities and forage for elk in Bates Creek watershed; remove overgrown conifer on 215 acres of curl leaf mahogany habitat in BLM Lost Creek area.

Park County—Support research project to study elk migration timing and routes in relationship to private lands, and study habitat use by elk and wolves in Absaroka Mountains.

Sheridan County—Thin 200 acres of encroaching forest to improve elk habitat in Bighorn National Forest; install weed-catchers to enhance structural support for beaver dams, which will restore stream morphology and riparian meadows along Big Willow Creek in Bighorn National Forest.

Sublette County—As part of a continuing stewardship project, thin overgrown forest to restore aspen and grasslands habitat for elk and other wildlife on privately owned, publicly accessibly timberlands.

Statewide—Sponsor Hunting and Fishing Heritage Expo, firearms handling and shooting clinics for youth and women, and Access Yes programs with Wyoming Game and Fish Department; newspaper advertising across Wyoming to celebrate RMEF achievements in conjunction with National Hunting and Fishing Day; radio advertising to build public awareness of RMEF achievements.

Sweetwater County—Develop water source with solar power to ensure water for livestock, elk and other wildlife on BLM lands.

Teton County—Prescribe burn 3,264 acres of elk winter and transition range to improve forage and aspen along Lower Gros Ventre area in Bridger-Teton National Forest; provide funding for “Don’t Poach the Powder” campaign to help protect elk winter range near Jackson Hole (also affects Lincoln County); sponsored Great Elk Tour at Jackson Hole Elk Fest.

Uinta County—Prescribe burn 455 acres of conifer slash to open habitat for aspen and grasslands habitat preferred by elk in Wasatch National Forest.

Washakie County—Thin 800 acres of juniper encroachment and restore sagebrush and grassland on elk winter range in BLM Rome Hill area.

Weston County—Seed 100 acres of native grass in a cleared, aspen regeneration project area for elk and other wildlife in Parmlee Canyon.

Partners for 2009 projects in Wyoming include Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest Service, Wyoming Game and Fish Department, other agencies, corporations, landowners and organizations.

Since 1984, the Elk Foundation and its partners have completed more than 380 conservation projects in Wyoming with a value of more than $36.3 million.

Hunters Hopefull to Protect Missouri Breaks Land

 

missouri-river-breaks-001

 

MISSOULA — The Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership in Missoula is mapping favorite hunting spots in Montana in hopes of avoiding conflicts between hunters and oil and gas developers.

 

The map is based on surveys of hunting and outdoors advocacy groups throughout the state and is intended to help land managers understand where high-value hunting areas are.

 

One such area is the Missouri Breaks.

 

“That’s the golden area of the state,” said Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership policy expert Bill Geer. “If we can’t do something there, I don’t know what I’m in this business for.”

 

A network of 40 hunting clubs has requested removal of 225,000 acres of public land from consideration for oil and gas leasing through the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. Their petition has won support from U.S. Sen. Jon Tester and received official review by BLM offices in eastern Montana.

[Read more…]

Elk Foundation Grants to Benefit 19 Oregon Counties

 

MISSOULA, Mont.—Nineteen counties in Oregon are slated for wildlife habitat conservation and public education projects using $207,030 in new grants from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

The 2009 RMEF grants will affect Baker, Benton, Coos, Crook, Curry, Douglas, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Malheur, Morrow, Tillamook, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa and Yamhill counties.

“Our volunteers across Oregon helped drive the 2008 fundraisers that made these grants possible. This is where Elk Foundation banquets, auctions and other events transform into on-the-ground conservation work, and its part of the payday for supporters who are passionate about giving something back to the outdoors,” said David Allen, Elk Foundation president and CEO.

[Read more…]

Elk Foundation Grants to Benefit 12 Washington Counties

 

MISSOULA, Mont. Twelve counties in Washington are slated for wildlife habitat conservation and public education projects using $199,651 in new grants from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. part of the payday for supporters who are passionate about giving something back to the outdoors, said David Allen, Elk Foundation president and CEO.lowing Washington conservation projects, listed by county:

The 2009 RMEF grants will affect Asotin, Clallam, Cowlitz, Ferry, Grays Harbor, Kittitas, Pend Oreille, San Juan, Skamania, Stevens, Thurston and Yakima counties.

Additionally, a biological research project has statewide interest.

Our volunteers across Washington helped drive the 2008 fundraisers that made these grants possible. This is where Elk Foundation banquets, auctions and other events transform into on-the-ground conservation work, and its

Elk Foundation grants will help fund the fol

Asotin County Identify and treat new weed infestations to improve forage for elk and other wildlife; treat 425 acres of newly discovered invasive rangeland weed (whitetop); treat 240 acres of noxious weeds along Lower Grande Ronde River.

Clallam County Use herbicides, lime, fertilizer and seed to improve 15 acres of elk forage near Bogachiel River.

Cowlitz County Harrow, lime, re-seed and/or fertilize 145 acres to reinvigorate herbaceous vegetation and improve elk forage at Mount St. Helens.

Ferry County Prescribe burn 1,022 acres of elk winter range to reclaim and maintain forage openings in Colville National Forest; enhance and expand Disabled Hunter Access program in Colville National Forest.

Grays Harbor County Create forage openings in dense tree stands and seed to improve habitat for elk and other wildlife in Quinault River Valley.

Kittitas County Assist with communication and education materials for Washington Department of Natural Resources Green Dot Access Management Program to enhance elk habitat in Naneum Ridge and Ahtanum State Forest (also affects Yakima County); prescribe burn 208 acres to reduce fuel loading, control weeds and improve elk habitat in Naneum Ridge State Forest.

Pend Oreille County Treat 20 acres of noxious weeds with herbicides, and prescribe burn 300 additional acres, to improve elk range in Colville National Forest.

San Juan County Sponsor youth conservation education camp in partnership with numerous other sponsors.

Skamania County Thin overgrown forest on 891 acres to improve summer range for elk and other wildlife in Gifford Pinchot National Forest; restore native vegetation and improve winter forage on 1,150 acres in Mount St. Helens mudslide area where elk have been nutritionally stressed in recent years.

Statewide Use data previously collected from Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington and Wyoming to answer questions regarding roles of climate, wolf predation and habitat quality on elk calf recruitment.

Thurston County Sponsored youth and family conservation programs in partnership with numerous other sponsors (also affects Stevens and Pend Oreille counties).

Yakima County Improve elk cover and forage by thinning and prescribe burning 394 acres in Wenatchee National Forest.

Partners for 2009 projects in Washington include Bureau of Land Management, University of Montana, U.S. Forest Service, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Washington Department of Natural Resources, other agencies, corporations, landowners and organizations.

Since 1984, the Elk Foundation and its partners have completed more than 402 conservation projects in Washington with a value of more than $96.8 million.

An additional $43,172 remains in the RMEF budget for additional Washington grants for 2009. Selected projects will be announced later this year.

BLM creates job to improve land access

BILLINGS (AP) — The U.S. Bureau of Land Management is creating a staff position to negotiate public access to BLM lands in Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota.

The bureau hopes to fill the Billings-based job of access program manager this spring. The BLM has 8.2 million acres in Montana and the Dakotas, and officials say too much is inaccessible to the public. Sometimes access is impeded when private and federal lands are side by side.

Gene Terland oversees the BLM for the three states. He says work by the new staffer will include identifying opportunities for rights of way, easements and property exchanges that will foster access.

 The annual salary for the new position will be $67,600.